Ingredient Wise: Dr. Brandt Skincare Magnetight Age Definer

Hello folks! I think the ingredient wise category on my blog is neglected a bit too much by yours truly so I’ve decided to give it some love today 🙂 In this series on the blog, we take a look at some hyped up beauty products and see if the ingredient list actually supports the claims they make in their marketing material. I have done a few of these over the past 2 years so if you would like to read up on those, click on the category titled Ingredient Wise on the left 🙂

A few months back everyone was talking about the coolest new face mask in town…a magnetic mask which sounded like a lot of fun to try out to be honest. Today I thought I would take a closer look at this hyped up mask from Dr. Brandt Skincare.

(Image Source: Sephora website )

Claims (From the Sephora website)

What it is:
An antiaging, iron-infused mask and magnet removal tool that work together to refine, purify, and brighten the look of skin.

Solutions for:
– Fine lines and wrinkles
– Pores
– Dullness and uneven skin tone
The MAGNETIGHT Age-Defier™ is a powerful mask that combats signs of aging and dramatically transforms the look of skin. Harnessing the power of attraction, the magnetic properties of the iron-based formula visibly reduce fine lines and wrinkles and lift away impurities as they calm and illuminte dull, stressed skin. The face appears magnetically youthful, bright, and energized.

Ingredient List ( From the Sephora website)

Iron Powder, Dimethicone, Polysilicone-11, Nylon-12, C12-15 Alkyl Benzoate, Silica, Tribehenin, Polymethylsilsesquioxane, PEG-10 Dimethicone, Polysorbate 40, HDI/Trimethylol Hexyllactone Crosspolymer, Ceramide Ng, PEG-10 Phytosterol, Tourmaline, Lavandula Angustifolia (Lavender) Oil, Isohexadecane, Ammonium Polyacryloyldimethyl Taurate, Citrus Aurantium Bergamia (Bergamot) Fruit Oil, Palmitoyl Hexapeptide-12, Pelargonium Graveolens (Geranium) Flower Oil, Dimethylmethoxy Chromanol, Anthemis Nobilis (Chamomile) Flower Oil, Limonene, Linalool, Citronellol, Geraniol

Do the claims work?

The very first ingredient in this face mask is iron powder which is what makes this the fun face mask to try. The magnet that comes along with the tub is used to ‘pull’ the mask from your face once you have let it sit on the skin for the stipulated amount of time. Now, besides the obvious fun factor that iron brings to this mask, does it really do anything for the skin?

The claims state that magnetic properties of this face mask can reduce fine lines and wrinkles…I am not so sure about that.  What gives this mask its magnetic properties is the iron but studies have shown that after a woman reaches menopause iron starts to accumulate in her skin. This accumulation leads to skin ageing and photo ageing. Women who are in their pre menopause years lose Iron from their bodies through menstruation and faster skin cell turnover since they are younger. Once you hit menopause ( when you start taking anti ageing skincare more seriously ) the accumulation of Iron in the body increases and reduces the antioxidative capacity of the skin. Oxidative damage in turn causes wrinkles. So in a way the number one ingredient in this anti ageing face mask is not something you should be putting on your face to combat ageing!! I wouldn’t go so far as to say that this mask does the reverse of what it claims, after all that iron sits on your skin for maybe 10 minutes. All the Iron does in this face mask in my opinion is the theatrics!! 😀

So if you have used this mask and found that it does reduce your fine lines and wrinkles, you can thank the next 2 ingredients listed in this mask. Both dimethicone and polysilicone -11 give a smooth appearance to the skin by filling in fine lines and pores. The rest of the ingredients consist of more silicones and also skin conditioning agents which make this a good moisturizing mask. So where is the anti ageing stuff in this mask? I’m not sure!

Tourmaline is a semi precious stone used in some cosmetic preparations. What does it do exactly? I am not sure! I was not able to find any independent studies confirming what cosmetic companies say about this ingredient. It is generally considered to impart a glow to the skin and also help stimulate the production of collagen but there is no evidence for any of those claims.

So overall this might work as a nice moisturizing mask which you can then take off with a magnet as a fun bonus! Once the novelty of this wears off I doubt I’ll be happy about the 75$ I would have spent on this face mask.

Have you tried this mask? What are your thoughts?

References 

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23752032
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4091310/
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23866012/
  4. http://www.paulaschoice.com.au/cosmetic-ingredient-dictionary/definition/tourmaline
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